CDE

Our students and projects

We currently have nearly 50 live projects with 40 companies.

Our proactive Research Engineers (REs) are involved in everything from procedural generation of content for international games companies to assistive technologies to help stroke rehabilitation via the future of interactive technologies for major broadcasters and virtual reality for naval training.

Specialist areas include:

Virtual and Augmented Reality applications, eye-tracking, automatic creation of 3D content, stop motion animation, assistive technology, brain rehabilitation, procedural content generation, real-time rendering, texture-mapping, serious games, UIX, HCI, voxels, fluid simulation, GPGPU programming, parallel computing, motion and facial capture, medical imaging, volumetric visualisation, interactive content, participatory design, the internet of things and automatic musculoskeletal simulation – among many others!

Get to know some of our REs below.


2017
John Raymond Hill
John Raymond Hill

I've always been excited by technologies which let us exceed our biological limitations and Virtual Reality offers endless possibility to achieve this. My research interests are in bringing down the barriers for communication between our senses and virtual environments to increase what we're able to experience and accomplish in them.

I am now a first-year student at Bournemouth University after coming to this course with a BSc in Computer Science and a few years out of academia. Please feel free to get in touch.


2016
Padraig Boulton (Paddy)
Padraig Boulton (Paddy)

Before coming to Bath I completed an MEng in Automotive Engineering at Loughborough university.  During that time I worked in motorsport aerodynamics for an industrial placement. Outside of university, my main interest is surfing (and luckily Bath is a lot closer to UK surf spots that Loughborough).  Everything that I am studying now is rather new to me, but I am looking forward to laying down the foundations of my research, the direction of which is yet to be decided. 


2016
Owen Morgan
Owen Morgan

I studied Engineering in my undergraduate degree and I am now interested in computer animation, gaming and machine learning, and possible research implications of these.


2016
Catherine Taylor
Catherine Taylor

I studied an undergraduate degree in Mathematics at Edinburgh University.  During my degree,I wrote a dissertation on Cosmological Models and studied a variety of courses including modelling, geometry and differential equations.  My research interest areas are VFX and computer animation. I am particularly interested in researching these for use in film.​


2016
Azeem Khan
Azeem Khan

I graduated from Imperial College London where I studied Physics - this was where I first learned how to code in Python, working on projects such as ray tracing and animating the motion of solitons (waves that propagate without changing their shape). Working on my MSci project gave me valuable experience in using C++ to extract key parameters from fake data samples. My hobbies include playing video games, watching films and scuba diving. I have travelled to many places around the world, including China where I interned at a mobile games company for two months.

My research interests include motion capture, physics-based animation and visual effects, and their applications in video games. I am also fascinated with virtual reality and how further research into this field will lead to truly immersive gaming experiences.


2016
Kyle Reed
Kyle Reed

My ambition has always been to be creative and work in an industry that exemplifies this philosophy. I view research as the ultimate form of creativity: discovering new paths to solving a problem. By studying Computer Science, I have developed many of the technical skills required to facilitate such problem solving. I am also a keen artist, and have found this skill is greatly enriched by having a background in technology.

My research interests consist of content generation and tool development for purposes of art, entertainment and any form of public engagement/service. I am particularly keen about projects involving user-generated content. An example of such being a project I am currently working on: generating personalised animation based on a single scan/photograph of a user. 


Research areas: Procedurally generated Modelling, Content Acquisition, Animation, Biometrics, VR/AR


2016
Lewis Edward Ball
Lewis Edward Ball
Supervisor:
Lihua You, Jian Jun Zhang

I studied Physics (BSc) and Scientific Computing (MSc) at the University of Warwick. 

I am mainly interested in real-time graphics and physics simulation with applications for interactive media.  I am currently in his first year within CDE at Bournemouth University and I am working hard on the foundations of my research.


2015
Javier Dehesa
Javier Dehesa
Supervisor:
Julian Padget
Industrial Supervisor:
Andrew Vidler

Creativity is arguably one of the most defining characteristics of the human nature, and a concept that machines still fail to grasp and emulate; yet, it is undisputed that technology is an ever-increasingly important enabler of human creativity. I explore the application of intelligent systems to artistic creation, and in particular to music performance, researching the interaction between a human player and virtual orchestras modelled after multi-agent systems principles. The goal of the project is to analyse the interplay and necessary collaboration that shall arise towards the production of pleasant and interesting music creations.


2015
Lazaros Michailidis
Lazaros Michailidis
Supervisor:
Dr. Emili Ballaguer-Balester

Immersion is the psycho-cognitive state, which mediates the interaction of an individual with an activity. My research is dedicated to uncovering the brain correlates of immersion in video games with electroencephalography. It has been said that if the game has the capacity to instil immersion, it will be a significant indicator of its success. However, we have yet to determine what exactly happens while a player is immersed, whether this state truly contributes to increased performance, and what the developers can do to maintain it.

For this purpose, I have developed a custom, virtual reality game of the Tower Defence genre, designated for Playstation VR, and we will also employ Machine Learning to detect the sustenance and loss of this state.

 

The project is in collaboration with Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe


2015
Thomas Joseph Matthews
Thomas Joseph Matthews
Supervisor:
Dr Feng Tian / Prof Wen Tang
Industrial Supervisor:
Tom Dolby

Virtual Reality (VR) is a growing and powerful medium that is finding traction in a variety of praxis. My research aims to tackle the specific aim of encouraging immersive learning and knowledge retention through short-form Educational VR experiences. 

Being an early form of technology, there are still a lot of design principles that need to be formed and better understood, and there is a lack of strong academic research underpinning the design, development and evaluation of VR products, particularly those with embedded learning.

I aim to develop a framework to support Educational VR production, and critically examine a number of short-form Educational VR prototypes built with this framework.

This project is supported by and embedded within AiSolve Ltd. I am currently based in AiSolve's Luton office.

View my profile here.


http://www.aisolve.com/


2015
Ifigeneia Mavridou
Ifigeneia Mavridou
Supervisor:
Dr. Emili Ballaguer-Balester, Dr Ellen Seis, Dr Alain Renaud
Industrial Supervisor:
Dr Charles Nduka

I am interested in the emotion stimulation and the identification of methods for emotion recognition in Virtual Reality (VR) Environments. Currently at Emteq, I am working towards enhancing human-computer interaction using emotional states as an input modality by assisting the development of a facial sensing platform that measures emotions through facial gestures and biometric responses. Emotion stimulation is related to engagement and “Presence” in games and VR. These factors can assist in the creation of immersive experiences as well as, the efficient content design of a VR product in terms of re-playability. The acquisition and analysis of physiologic signals and facial expressions play an important role in my studies towards evaluating and measuring the dimensions of affect, and it’s relation to cognitive processes such as attention and memory. For my studies I will start a sequence of user-behaviour experiments in VR conditions in order to explore emotion stimulation, identification and recognition in VR.


2015
Joanna Tarko
Joanna Tarko
Supervisor:
Prof Peter Hall and Dr Christian Richardt

My research interests are in applications of computer vision and machine learning techniques for visual effects, especially for camera tracking and rotoscopy. I am currently working on the camera pose estimation in six degrees of freedom with the use of different external sensors.​My research interests are in applications of computer vision and machine learning techniques for visual effects, especially for camera tracking and rotoscopy. I am currently working on the camera pose estimation in six degrees of freedom with the use of different external sensors.​


2015
Naval Bhandari
Naval Bhandari

Since the dawn of time, man has pioneered to achieve realistic graphical simulation of natural phenomena. I hope to be one such man that will push forward this ultimate cause of our species. I'm also interested in VR.


2015
Simone Barbieri
Simone Barbieri

During the early stages of design, the artists make sketches using paper and pencil. In fact, sketching is a natural and flexible interface to represent conceptual designs. There are several advantages in using pencil and paper:

  • there is no need, for the author, to acquire any special knowledge;
  • it is easy, for the author, to change the result;
  • the precision is not required to express an idea.

Thus, a system which involve a sketching interface requires the same advantages to be convenient, or, at least, benefits that are greater or comparable to them.

However, posing and modelling 3D characters from 2D input is a complex and open problem.

My idea is to create a system that allows the user to pose the character and, eventually, remodel each section by exploiting the character’s outline.

The proposed techniques will allow the user to draw a few simple sketches which will not only pose the character but also guide the detailed deformation on the shape flow, allowing him to draw just a partial outline of the character’s components, leaving untouched the other ones.


2014
Asha Ward
Asha Ward
Supervisor:
Dr Tom Davis

Music Technology for users with Complex Needs.

Music Technology for users with Complex Needs.

Music is essential to most of us, it can light up all areas of the brain, help develop skills with communication, help to establish identity, and allow a unique path for expression. People with complex needs can face barriers to participation with music-making and sound exploration activities when using instruments and technology aimed at typically able users. My research explores the creation of novel and bespoke hardware and software to allow accessibility to music creation for those with cognitive, physical, or sensory impairments and/or disabilities. Using tools like Arduino and sensor based hardware, alongside software such as Max/MSP and Ableton Live, the aim is to provide innovative systems that allow for the creation of personal instruments that tailor to individual needs and capabilities. These instruments can then be used to interact with sound in new ways not available with traditional acoustic instruments. Technology can be used to turn tiny movements into huge sounds and tangible user interfaces can be used to investigate the relationship between the physical and digital world, leading to new modes of interaction. Working with my industrial sponsor the Three Ways School in Bath and industrial mentor Luke Woodbury of Dotlib, my research will take use an Action Research methodology to create bespoke, tangible tools that combine hardware and software allowing central users, and those facilitating, to create and explore sound in a participatory way.


2014
Ieva Kazlauskaite
Ieva Kazlauskaite
Supervisor:
Neill Campbell
Industrial Supervisor:
Tom Waterson

My interests are in machine learning, optimisation, data reduction, character animation, interactive computer graphics and other related areas. 


2014
Garoe Dorta Perez
Garoe Dorta Perez

My main research interests lie in the areas of machine learning and computer vision, my current project at Anthropics Technology Ltd.

involves face modelling applications using deep neural networks (DNN).

This ties in with the software produced at the company, that is centred around human beauty with a special focus on facial analytics.


2014
Rosie Campbell
Rosie Campbell

As emerging technology enables increasingly compelling mixed reality experiences,  the ability to convincingly blend the real and the virtual becomes essential. My research aims to match video-based graphics to polygonal CG environments, so that video footage can be seamlessly integrated into stylised virtual worlds. I will explore techniques such as video relighting and colour transfer, as well as novel capture methods such as light field cameras. I am based at BBC R&D in Salford, where my research contributes to projects exploring the convergence of broadcasting and video games.


2014
Mark Moseley
Mark Moseley
Supervisor:
Leigh McLoughlin

My research is based within the area of Assistive Technology:

Young people who have complex physical disabilities and good cognition may face many barriers to learning, communication, personal development, physical interaction and play experiences. Physical interaction and play are known to be important components of child development, but this group currently has few suitable ways in which to participate in these activities.

Technology can help to facilitate such experiences. My research aims to develop a technology-based tool to provide this group with the potential for physical interaction and physical play, by providing a means of manipulating objects.  The tool will be used to develop the target group's knowledge of spatial concepts and the properties of objects. It will utilise eye gaze technology, robotics and haptic feedback (artificial sensation) in order to simulate physical control and sensations.

My research will involve Victoria Education Centre in Poole, Dorset.


2013
Tom Wrigglesworth
Tom Wrigglesworth
Supervisor:
Leon Watts
Industrial Supervisor:
Jenny Cousins

I am researching how novice users engage with online museum collections through crowd-sourcing initiatives. My project is in collaboration with the Imperial War Museums and is primarily focused on the American Air Museum website - a large online archive of media and information that accommodates crowd-sourced contributions. My research interests are in Human-Computer Interaction, Research Through Design methodologies and encounters with cultural heritage through web-browser based technologies.


2013
Richard Jones
Richard Jones
Supervisor:
Dr Richard Southern
Industrial Supervisor:
James Bird & Ian Masters

Richard is working alongside VFX studio Double Negative to develop improvements to the liquid simulation toolset for creating turbulent liquid and whitewater effects for feature film visual effects. The current toolset for liquid simulation is built around the creation of simple single-phase liquid motion, such as ocean waves and simple splashes, but struggles to capture the often more exciting mixed air-liquid phenomena of very turbulent fluid splashes and sprays. Therefore the creation of turbulent effects relies very heavily on artistic input and having the experience and intuition to use existing tools in unorthodox ways. By incorporating more physical models for turbulent fluid phenomena into the existing liquid simulation toolset, his project aims to develop techniques to greater capture realistic turbulent fluid effects and allow faster turnover of the highly detailed liquid effects required for feature film.


2013
Stephane Le Boeuf
Stephane Le Boeuf

Since the beginning of mankind, man have tried to reproduce its universe. Due to the various movies which need a realistic universe, computer scientist developed physical photorealistic rendering and plausible photorealistic rendering. I am working to solve this problem. 2 approaches will be good, find a new faster way to render physically based scene, or find a way to digitalize the real. GPU are becoming faster and faster, so I am working on a way to use it right and efficiently to produce relevant solution for the VFX industry.


2013
Zack Lyons
Zack Lyons
Supervisor:
Leon Watts
Industrial Supervisor:
Nigel Harris

My research involves using interactive computational simulations to deliver meaningful benefits to people with acquired brain injuries. It will contribute to the science base on human-agent interaction, as well as to research on Human-Computer Interaction in mental health. I am currently carrying out exploratory work with the intention of articulating design goals to inform future development of simulations. The envisioned emphasis of the project is in exploring the unique dynamics of the three-way interaction between clients, clinicians and the machine.


2013
Anamaria Ciucanu
Anamaria Ciucanu
Supervisor:
Darren Cosker
Industrial Supervisor:
Iain Gilfeather

Stop Motion 3D

Fat Pebble create games using stop motion animation. All of their characters are handmade, with materials such as clay, play-doh, fabric etc. Currently, elements are represented as 2D sprites in the games (eg. Clay Jam). This research project looks into bringing the full 3D character into the game, for a more exciting user experience. Techniques like photogrammetry, pose matching and prior material properties will be used to recreate the models from the real world.

 

Formerly at Fat Pebble


2013
Tom Smith
Tom Smith
Supervisor:
Julian Padget
Industrial Supervisor:
Andrew Vidler

Procedural content generation (PCG) is increasingly used in games to produce varied and interesting content. However PCG systems are becoming increasingly complex and tailored to specific game environments, making them difficult to reuse, and so we investigate ways to make the PCG code reusable and allow simpler, usable descriptions of the desired output. By allowing the behaviour of the generator to be specified without altering the code, we provide increasingly data-driven, modular generation. We look at reusing tools and techniques originally developed for the semantic web, and investigate the possibility of using them with industry-standard games development tools.


2013
Rahul Dey
Rahul Dey

This research focuses on using real time voxelization algorithms and procedurally creating content in voxel spaces. Creating content using voxels is more intuitive than polygon modelling and possesses a number of other advantages. This research intends to provide novel methods for real time voxelization and subsequently editing them using procedural generation techniques. These methods will also be adapted for next generation consoles and take advantage of the features that they expose.


2013
Daniela De Angeli
Daniela De Angeli
Supervisor:
Eamonn O'Neill
Industrial Supervisor:
Rupert Goulding

Over the past few decades, museums have become steadily more visitor-focused, integrating digital practices into their programs to diversify appeal across demographic groups and to encourage and enhance visits.  In particular, Augmented Reality (AR) has received much attention from museums for its capability to both provide additional content and support users' navigation in real space.  Through a collaborative research between the University of Bath and the National Trust, we will implement AR applications as a tool to analyze visitors' behaviour with real and virtual objects in the museum context.

 


http://www.danieladeangeli.com


2013
Adam Boulton
Adam Boulton
Supervisor:
Rachid Hourizi
Industrial Supervisor:
Alice Guy

The cost of video game development is rapidly increasing as the technological demands of producing high quality games grow ever larger. With budgets set to spiral into the hundreds of millions of dollars, and audience sizes rapidly expanding as gaming reaches new platforms, we investigate the phenomenon of task abandonment in games. Even the most critically acclaimed titles are rarely completed by even half their audience. With the cost of development so high, it is more important than ever that developers, as well as the players, get value for money. We ask why so few people are finishing their games, and investigate whether anything can be done to improve these numbers.


2013
Fabio Turchet
Fabio Turchet

My research project focuses on the simulation of muskuloskeletal systems for the visual effect industry. Movies often features creatures
and digital doubles that have to look real and part of this realism comes from an anatomically correct deformation of soft tissues and skin.


Challenges in the area are represented by the complexity of the many interacting muscles present in the body that have to be simulated numerically and efficiently with methods that take into account collisions, material anisotropy, non-linearity and artistic control.


2013
Elena Marimon Munoz
Elena Marimon Munoz

Digital Radiography: Image acquisition and Image enhancement

My project is sponsored by PerkinElmer, a multinational technology corporation focused on human and environmental health and the Centre for Digital Entertainment. The project focuses on the characterization of some of the components that affects the image acquisition of a Dexela CMOS X-ray detector and in the development of scatter removal software for image post-processing in mammography applications.


2012
Kwamina Edum-Fotwe
Kwamina Edum-Fotwe
Supervisor:
Matt Brown
Industrial Supervisor:
Dan Harper

Recovery of Sparse Architectural Models from Aerial and Ground-Based LiDAR (Point-Clouds) for use in Interactive Visualisation and Simulation. The focus of my project is the efficient recovery of sparse architectural models from aerial and ground-based LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) scans. The key objective is to be able to turn unstructured point-clouds into clean, lightweight 3D models for use in Interactive Visualisation and Simulation. The research relies heavily on Computer Graphics, Image Processing and Data-Driven Procedural Modelling. 


2012
Owen O'Neil
Owen O'Neil
Supervisor:
Christos Gatzidis

In the UK, over 150,000 people experience a first time stroke each year. It is the most common cause of severe adult disability, and data from 2012 suggests that there are around 1.1 million survivors in the UK suffering from a wide spectrum of both physical and psychological disabilities including loss of language, memory, use of limbs and depression. The impetus of Stroke research is to explore avenues that may improve treatment, patient care and preventative measures.

Our research is focused on critically evaluating the use of low-cost, easily accessible commercial technologies and how these may, or may not, be of therapeutic value in the neuromuscular rehabilitation of patients. Recent examples of research in this area have identified technologies such as Nintendo Wii, Xbox Kinect, augmented and virtual reality as potentially exciting avenues of research. 


2012
Phil Wilkinson
Phil Wilkinson

Game Makers is an after school club run at the Isle of Portland Aldridge Community Academy (IPACA). During this club college students ate tapping into the growing trend in society towards developing purposeful games and developing Games for Social Change. These games are designed to raise awareness of social issues in their community. This research project will explore the process of games development as a creative research method. Through this learner-led discussion and ludic articulation  of community issues it is hypothesised that a deeper understanding of learner perspectives will be developed. Additionally this research project attempts to overcome traditional barriers to research such as prescriptive data capture and ecologically invalid research methods.


2012
Alastair Barber
Alastair Barber
Supervisor:
Darren Cosker
Industrial Supervisor:
Oliver James & Ted Waine

I am investigating methods for improving the overall camera tracking process within the visual effects pipeline. My work has proposed new algorithms for determining camera movement in challenging conditions such as fast camera movement leading to motion blur, and also for registering on set measurements and data to camera footage. Right now I am taking a broader look at the overall process of camera tracking and exploiting the massive amounts of data available at Double Negative. We aim to identify the most common types of problematic shots to track and also make available useful statistics on the process to the business and wider academic community.


http://www.alastairbarber.com


2012
Charlotte Hoare
Charlotte Hoare
Supervisor:
Danae Stanton Fraser

Charlotte is embedded within the user experience group at BBC R&D in Salford. Charlotte's research focuses on multi-screen experiences in the living room, specifically looking at the implications of for the user. This involves prototyping multi-screen experiences, developing methodologies to evaluate them, and ultimately providing recommendations for designers of future interactive living rooms.


2012
Matthew Thompson
Matthew Thompson
Supervisor:
Julian Padget
Industrial Supervisor:
Steve Battle and Andy Sinclair

Computer games and virtual reality environments offer new experiences in interactive entertainment. However, the stories in these new media remain the same: linear and scripted, unaffected by the decisions a player makes. I am looking into ways to create stories that react to a player's actions, in order to create infinitely replayable games and interactive experiences.


2012
Andreea Bizdideanu

Andreea Bizdideanu

The current focus of my research is the perusal and advancement of global illumination techniques in the context of physically–based rendering. Monte Carlo ray tracing is a versatile class of global illumination techniques capable of reproducing a wide range of light phenomena. One of the advantages this class of algorithms displays over others, is the ability to handle complex surface geometries, material definitions and light sources, as they occur in real environments. In conjunction with the capacity of producing unbiased results, this advantage represents the essence of state–of–the–art rendering. However, Monte Carlo ray tracing algorithms are notorious for being onerous in terms of computational time. As such one practical goal of my research is to develop a light transport simulation framework, based on Monte Carlo ray tracing, which achieves interactive rates. In other words, we use the recent advancements in graphics hardware and technology to develop a bidirectional path tracing solution. Starting from this basis we intend to harness the generality and flexibility of sampling paths at finding adaptive solutions that would minimize variance, the main problematic aspect of Monte Carlo ray tracing. That is, we focus on path manipulation as way to reduce variance, but also as a resource to include additional estimators (i.e. light effects) and attain some degree of scene dynamism.


2012
Dhana Frerichs
Dhana Frerichs
Supervisor:
Christos Gatzidis
Industrial Supervisor:
Andrew Vidler

Computer Graphics Simulation of Post-Mortem Optical and Morpholo

Creating realistic looking scenes is an important goal in computer graphics. In particular, in the real-time games industry, one can observe an increasing trend towards realism. Despite this, ageing effects, such as rusting and rotting, are often neglected.  This is particularly noticeable in the way corpses are depicted in game worlds, which show no signs of decay and tend to simply disappear from the world after a while. We concentrate on simulating some of these post mortem appearance changes. In particular the skin colouration changes caused by blood pooling (livor mortis) and morphology changes due to dehydration (mummification). The aim of the research is to determine whether it is possible to simulate object morphology changes due to organic decomposition and reproduce the results in real-time. 


2012
Alex Gouvatsos
Alex Gouvatsos

My research is mostly focused around 3D animation pipelines. More specifically, I'm interested in creating an efficient bridge between traditional 2D elements of the animation pipeline such as storyboard drawings and the 3D elements that come later. Apart from developing new algorithms, this also includes understanding what information can be used to make artists more efficient throughout.


2012
Hashim Yaqub
Hashim Yaqub
Supervisor:
Paul Shepherd
Industrial Supervisor:
Simon Luck

My research involves evaluating the effectiveness of consumer off-the-shelf HMDs in Virtual Maritime Training. I am based at BMT Defence Services, Bath, with a department who specialises in developing training solutions for naval platforms. My work involves using new consumer VR technologies like the Oculus Rift in training scenario's which include platform familiarisation, maintenance, and emergency procedures. Currently my projects are extending to having multiple users interacting with each other in the same environment via these devices.


2012
Milto Miltiadou
Milto Miltiadou
Supervisor:
Matt Brown
Industrial Supervisor:
Mike Grant

Traditional ways of forest management and forest health monitoring suggest collecting ground tree information with fieldworks, which it is time consuming and lacks of spatial coverage. For that reason, multiple sensors has been created to automate the process of collecting information. In this research, full-waveform LiDAR data and hyperspectral Images from New Forest are provided by NERC ARSF and the aim of my project is to enhance the visualisations of this data and investigate the benefits of integrating multi-sensors data for forest management. On the one hand visualisations are used for getting information across especially to people with no technical background. Volumetric representation of fw LiDAR data has been introduced by Persson et al, 2005, while volumetric visualisation has been widely used in medical imaging, visual effects and molecular science. In this project, new algorithms and structures are introduced for optimising polygonisation and direct rendering of volumetric fw LiDAR data. On the other hand the integration of the data aims to combine different capabilities of the sensors and investigate how the combination of the data could improve tree crowns detection and segmentation.


2011
David Gillespie

David Gillespie

Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination.

 

The research that is being undertaken at the National Museums Liverpool (NML): focuses on both the dissemination and sharing of high resolution 3D cultural heritage artefacts via the internet and WebGL but it is also undertaking the novel challenge of creating textures for these 3D artefacts. Colour information that can be captured for an artefact via a laser scanner or other techniques (i.e. photogrammetry) can be flawed; where they can contain visual artefacts and they may not capture a full visual representation of the original artefact. The research with NML will focus on the use of 3D texture synthesis instead of 2D textures. Attempting to resolve some of the issues surrounding computation and memory required for the synthesis of such textures.


2011
Ralph Potter
Ralph Potter
Supervisor:
Russell Bradford

SYCL/C++ combination and HSA based ray tracing.


2009
Stephen Willey
Stephen Willey
Supervisor:
Phil Willis
Industrial Supervisor:
Jeff Clifford

There are many considerations that must go into making a 3D film that aren't a problem with standard 2D ones.  We investigate the problems of colour mismatch, vertical alignment, and disparity map generation while providing an in-depth study into the further requirements of a 3D film.  In addition, we introduce several tools that integrate into the existing post-production pipeline in order to improve it's capabilities when dealing with stereo images.




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